Posts in Living Abroad
8 Ways the Selfie Generation Can Honor the Greatest Generation

I used to think dying in a fire would be the worst way to go. I now believe selfie-related deaths top that. Our self-obsessed culture has weighed on my mind in recent days as the world recognized the 75th anniversary of D-Day, the largest air, sea, and land operation in the history of war. On D-Day alone, Nazis killed nearly 4,500 Allied troops and injured many more. In one day. And I keep asking myself: Are we living lives that honor that sacrifice?

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Brexit: How Did We Get Here (and How We Hope it Will End)

A lot of the news stories about Brexit are wonky and confusing, so I invited my British friend, Mark Robson, to come on the Postcard Academy podcast to explain what Brexit means in language everyone can understand. In part one, Mark and I dive into some European history to explain how Brexit came to be. In part 2, we talk about how it feels to be living in England during this crazy time, which has been described as serious as WWII, and we share our predictions and dreams for the U.K. 


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Workaway: 9 Tips to Live Like a Local and Travel the World Through Work Exchanges

My friends Daniel and Alinne fell in love when Daniel, an American, lived in Brazil for work as a stunt coordinator. They knew they wanted to stay together, but the U.S. denied Alinne, who’s Brazilian, a visa. To avoid the bureaucracy that plagues multi-national relationships, they decided to travel the world together instead of sticking to one place — and this journey has continued for nearly two years. Volunteering through Workaway has financially enabled them to keep traveling as long as they have. In the latest episode of the Postcard Academy podcast, they share their story and advice on how you can travel more by working your way around the world.

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Why I, an Immigrant, Joined the People’s March Against Brexit

Personally, I don’t want Brexit to happen because, as an E.U. citizen, I would like to remain living and working here without any complications or fears of getting kicked out. I also believe in the core tenets of the European Union: human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, rule of law, and human rights. When expats on my podcast talk about identifying with the values of their adopted European countries, this is what they’re talking about. And in a world seemingly run by cartoon villains happy to destroy democracy and the Earth, a strong and unified Europe that fights for these values is essential. 

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Working Abroad: 6 Countries that are Great for Freelancers

Born in Bermuda, Lené Hypolite has lived in Venezuela, Canada, the U.S., Amsterdam, and is soon headed to Singapore and Tokyo. She loves the excitement of expat life, and also how its benefiting her career. On the Postcard Academy podcast, we talk about six countries where it’s a little bit easier visa-wise to live abroad, and how to find work there.

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Searching for Jobs and Linguistic Misunderstandings

They use more slang here and their use of the language charms me. I met up with an Italian for a conversation exchange Friday and she brought a London travel book, which was filled with comments such as “Next time we’re at this homely spot, we’ll plump for the Victorian sponge,” which I attempted to interpret for my new friend. My flatmate and I recently had our own misunderstanding online.

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My American Immigrant Experience in Italy

I’ve experienced so much in the last few months, and actually feel like an Italian resident rather than just a visitor. I’ve made some great friendships and enjoyed living in Reggio Emilia, a progressive city that has everything from theatre to bookshops to cafes. There is a ton of green space and the recycling system is more advanced than in any other city I’ve lived in. Strangely, very often I found myself defending Reggio to the natives. “You came from New York? Why are you here? It’s so boring!” I think the city is great, and secretly many of them must, too, because for all their lamenting, they don’t leave.

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Italian Unification Day

On March 17, My roommates and I went to Dimmelotu in honor of Italian Unification Day, but really it was just an excuse to go out. No Italians I know care that Italy has been a unified country for 150 years, and they only celebrate this fact every 50 years or so. The Festival of the Republic is much more important and is recognized annually on June 2. In 1946, Italians voted to end the monarchy (which had backed Mussolini) and become a republic.

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